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Professional books / Anxieties in general

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What Every Therapist Needs to Know about Anxiety Disorders

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Boot Camp Therapy

As the pragmatics of clinical work today mandate that we incorporate brief therapy skills into our repertoire,Boot Camp Therapy simultaneously respects and challenges our current treatment orientation. This book is bold stuff that will make you uncomfortable—a guiding principle is ‘ready, fire, aim’—but Robert Taibbi immediately tethers readers to a simple, overarching perspective and step-by-step structure for this action-focused therapy. I am so glad I took the time to read this fast-paced book on fast-paced therapy.

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Anxiety Rescue: Simple Strategies to Stop Fear from Ruling Your Life

by Kathryn Tristan (paperback, 191 pages). Here is a practical, cleverly written book from one who has recovered.

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The Developmental Psychopathology of Anxiety

by Michael W. Vasey & Mark R. Dadds (Editors), (Hardcover, 510 pages, 2001)

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Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective

by Aaron T. Beck, M.D., Gary Emery, Ph.D. & Ruth L. Greenberg, Ph.D. (Paperback, 368 pages, 1990)  Here is the first book in the field to present a comprehensive cognitive model for understanding and treating anxiety disorders and phobias. "This important book lays the groundwork for cognitive therapy of phobias and anxiety disorders and offers promise for significant advances in therapeutics".

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Handbook of the Treatment of the Anxiety Disorders

by Carol Lindemann, Ph.D. (Editor),  (Hardcover, 296 pages, 2nd edition, 1996)  My long-time friend Dr. Carol Lindemann has put together a team of experts in cognitive therapy, behaviorism, psychopharmacology, and psychodynamic and group therapy.

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Anxiety and Its Disorders: The Nature and Treatment of Anxiety and Panic (Second Edition)

by David H. Barlow, Ph.D. (Paperback, 704 pages, 2004) 

"Barlow has once again produced a masterpiece. This volume combines comprehensive reviews of theory and research with innovative, clinically meaningful, empirically based models of each anxiety disorder. Like its predecessor, it will serve as the preeminent guide for research and treatment development for years to come. This book should be required reading for clinicians and clinical scientists working with anxiety disorders. Its clearly presented, readable content also makes it a highly appropriate text for advanced undergraduate and graduate-level psychopathology courses." --T. D. Borkovec, PhD, Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.

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Treating Stress and Anxiety: A Practitioner's Guide to Evidence-Based Approaches

Lillian Nejad, Ph.D. & Katerina Volny, BSc (188 pages, paperback), New York: Crown, 2008.

In this straight-forward, well-organized handbook, health professionals can have confidence that the techniques suggested are well-supported by clinical research. The book structures topics so that you can rapidly organize treatment interventions and support them by ready-made handouts and worksheets. A great teaching tool for the new clinician in this field and an efficient time-saver for the seasoned anxiety specialist. Bonus: An included CD provides reproducible handouts and worksheets for clients and relaxation tracks.

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Anxiety Disorders in Adults: An Evidence-Based Approach to Psychological Treatment

by Peter D. McLean & Sheila R. Woody, (Hardcover, 369 pages, 2001)

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The Prevention of Anxiety and Depression

by Robert L. Leahy and Stephen J. Holland (Paperback, 332 pages, 2000).

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Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

by Robert L. Leahy and Stephen J. Holland (Paperback, 332 pages, 2000).

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Cognitive Therapy of Anxiety Disorders: Science & Practice

by David A. Clark, Ph.D. & Aaron T. Beck, M.D., (628 pages, hardback), New York: Guilford Press, 2010. 

Aaron Beck is considered the father of cognitive therapy. I had the honor of having him serve as my dissertation external advisor way back in 1978. I have considered myself a cognitive therapist since that time.  David A. Clark has done an outstanding job (I believe he called it “painstaking”) over the past four years of reviewing, evaluating and synthesizing the enormous research and clinical literature on the cognitive perspective toward anxiety. Beck published his first book on the cognitive treatment model for the anxiety disorders in 1985.  This new book updates and refines Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective based on two decades of further research. The great news for practitioners is just how useful this book is.  Don’t be scared off by the “science” in the subtitle; there is no question that this is a practical treatment manual.  In fact, the last five chapters are really mini treatment manuals for panic disorder, social phobia, GAD, OCD, and PTSD.  Plus you’ll find rating scales, checklists, structured diaries—almost forty reproducible handouts and forms. In every chapter you will find "Clinician Guidelines." Each is a boxed-in few sentences that reinforce key points. They serve as a great way for experienced clinicians to scan through sections of this sizable book and settle in on passages that expand their comprehension.  If you are ready to sharpen your clinical skills, you will truly appreciate this book.

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